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Zenit Fan Group: No Blacks, No Gays

Published: December 19, 2012 (Issue # 1740)



  • Zenits Hulk and Axel Witsel attend a match between Zenit and Terek Grozny in St. Petersburg back in September.
    Photo: DMITRY LOVETSKY / AP

Fans oftwo-time defending Russian champion Zenit St. Petersburg are calling fornon-white andgay players tobe excluded fromthe team.

Landscrona, thelargest Zenit supporters club, released amanifesto Monday demanding theclub field anall-white, heterosexual team. It added that dark-skinned players are all but forced down Zenits throat now, which only brings out anegative reaction andsaid gay players were unworthy ofour great city.

Theclub, which is owned bystate-controlled natural gas giant Gazprom, told theR-Sport news agency that it supported tolerance andpicked players onathletic ability alone, insisting that the teams policy is aimed atdevelopment andintegration intothe world soccer community, andholds no archaic views.

Zenit had been theonly top-flight Russian team never tohave signed ablack player until this summer, when it acquired Brazilian striker Hulk andBelgian midfielder Axel Witsel for80 million euros ($105 million). French midfielder Yann MVila declined amove tothe club inAugust after receiving death threats.

Fans insisted that we are not racists and, forus, theabsence ofblack Zenit players is just animportant tradition that underlines theteams identity andnothing more.

Russia has struggled todeal with racism andviolence atits stadiums as it prepares tohost theWorld Cup in2018. Black players are frequently thetargets ofmonkey chants andsome, including Anzhi Makhachkalas Robert Carlos andChristopher Samba, have had bananas thrown atthem byfans.

Officials have attimes shown little enthusiasm fortargeting racism. When Lokomotiv Moscow fans held up abanner in2010 thanking anEnglish team forsigning their black striker Peter Odemwingie with apicture ofa banana, thehead ofRussias World Cup bid awkwardly claimed they were referencing aquaint, little-used Russian expression meaning to fail anexam.

Zenits fans have long been thecountrys most problematic. Dick Advocaat, theteams former Dutch manager, once admitted that the fans dont like black players andthat it would be impossible forZenit tosign one.

Several black players have also singled out Zenits fans as particularly racist. Former Russian top scorer Vagner Love told aBrazilian newspaper inApril that Zenit was the most racist team inRussia andthe only one whose fans had abused him inhis seven years playing forCSKA Moscow.

Five years earlier, Krylya Sovetov Samaras former Cameroon international Serge Branco told alocal newspaper that Zenits management was the real racists fornot combating theproblem, adding that in acivilized country theyd smack them down tothe third division fortheir fans behavior.

Zenits fans have also come under thespotlight recently after one ofthem threw afirecracker that injured Dinamo Moscows goalkeeper during amatch inNovember. Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, himself aZenit fan, called forviolent spectators tobe banned forlife fromattending matches. Parliament has drafted abill that would ban hooligans fora year.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



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