Tuesday, September 2, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

  Print this article Print this article

K-19 Film Premieres at Mariinsky Theater

Published: October 8, 2002 (Issue # 810)


The film "K-19: The Widowmaker," about a Soviet nuclear submarine that suffered a deadly reactor failure in the North Atlantic in 1961, drew mixed reviews on the weekend from some of its most knowledgeable critics - the crew of the boat itself.

Fifty-two veterans and widows of the crew of the submarine were flown in from across Russia and Ukraine to attend the Russian premiere of the film at a gala event at the Mariinsky Theater on Sunday. After the screening, they praised the film for the heroism portrayed by the actors, but took issue with what they described as a large number of inaccuracies.

"I'm very thankful to the American filmmakers who finally reflected the heroism of the K-19 sailors, who had to keep silent about the accident for decades," said Vladimir Pogorelov, who served as the chief of the electrical engineering group on the sub.

Yuri Mukhin, another K-19 veteran, agreed, calling the movie "impressive." He said that the film affected him to such a degree that he had to take a heart pill during the screening.

The K-19 (later given the nickname "Hiroshima" by Russian sailors) was the first Soviet sub to carry ballistic missiles and was on its first training voyage in neutral waters in the North Atlantic in July 1961, when the coolant system for its nuclear reactor began to leak, causing a rise in reactor-core temperature, and threatening a meltdown and the possible detonation of its missiles.

The danger posed by the accident was extreme. An explosion so close to NATO bases could have provoked a NATO response, ultimately leading to a nuclear confrontation during the Cold War.

But the severe crisis was averted by the actions of the submarine's captain, Nikolai Zateyev, and the crew of 139, who remained aboard the vessel to repair the coolant system, ultimately exposing themselves to severe doses of radiation. Eight of the submariners died within two weeks of the episode, and 12 more died over the next two years. A large number of the remainder suffered longer-term sickness and disability.

Big-name producer Kathryn Bigalow ("Point Break," "The Weight of Water") of Intermedia Films took the ship's story as the material for her next blockbuster film, which was budgeted at $90 million.

The film stars Harrison Ford as Zateyev.

Bigalow, who was on hand for the premiere, along with co-star Liam Neeson, explained the draw of the story for herself and U.S. audiences.

Pages: [1] [2 ] [3]






 

ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Sept. 3


Although the Peter and Paul Fortress sand sculptures are more central and therefore more visible to the throngs of tourists, the 300th Anniversary Park of St. Petersburgs own collection closes today. The World Collection of Sand Sculptures that have been on display at the park reaches its final day, so fans of the classic beach activity should get there while they can.



Thursday, Sept. 4


Vladimir I. Danchenkov, Head of Baltic Customs, will be in attendance during AmChams Customs and Transportation Committee Meeting convening this afternoon at the organizations office near St. Isaacs Square at 3 p.m.



Friday, Sept. 5


Scrabble lovers and chess masters get their chance to assert their intellectual dominance at the return of the British Book Centers Board Game Evenings tonight. Held weekly on Friday nights, the event gives both board game lovers and those hoping to improve their English the chance to meet, greet and compete. Check out the centers VK page for more details.



Saturday, Sept. 6


Athletes will relish the chance to get the latest gear and try out something new at I Choose Sport, an annual event at Lenexpo forum that plans to welcome more than 30,000 people this week to the international exhibition center. Not only will visitors get to try their hand at various athletic endeavors but they will also be able to peruse equipment that can fulfill their dreams of becoming a champion.


Local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg open their season this evening at home against Lokomotiv Yarovslavl at the Ice Palace arena next to the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. See their website for a full schedule and available tickets.



Sunday, Sept. 7


Check out retro and antique cars at Fort Konstantin on Kronstadt Island in the Gulf of Finland at FORTuna, a yearly car festival that highlights the eccentricities of the Soviet automobile industry. A car race, contests and a stunt show will give visitors a chance to rev their engines.



Monday, Sept. 8


This evening marks the opening of the two-week ballet festival High Season at the Mikhailovsky Theater. Check the theaters website for more details about performances and featured dancers.



Tuesday, Sept. 9


Discuss the latest news and issues at the AmCham Hazardous Waste Management Roundtable this morning in the Tango Conference Hall of the Sokos Hotel Palace Bridge on Birzhevoy Pereulok. Starting at 9 a.m., planned topics include the Krasny Bor landfill and waste transportation between Russia and Finland.


Learn more about the citys modern architectural trends at the SPIBA Real Estate and Construction Committees meeting on the topic Contemporary Petersburg Style: What is It? Participants will get the chance to discuss whats in-demand with RBI Holdings Irina Petrova and Lubava Pryanikova, and the current state of the local real estate market. Please confirm your attendance by Sept. 5 through SPIBAs website if you wish to attend.



Times Talk